You can skip this part and come back to it later, but it deals in-depth, with the Artefact Journal & Field Diary, what it’s all, about and the setup…

Let me introduce you to the future of recording your finds, along with the sights and sounds you encounter along the way, and the beauty of all of this, it can take less than five minutes to complete when you get home, or as long as you want…
This Artefact Journal & Field Diary is a two-page recording system, as you open the book to your first dig page, you will see that the Artefact Journal is placed on your left-hand side, whilst the Field Diary is on the right-hand side, with everything in view and placed in order ready for you to enter the details for that particular day’s hunt…
This Artefact Journal and Field Diary can be a basic record system, which in itself is simple or you can incorporate some or all of the features within this book, to keep track of your movements, fields, rallies, and whereabouts you store your finds, with every part of the book linked back to the findspot, storage, day and date etc…


So, what is the Artefact Journal & Field Diary, & what does it do, put quite simply, you record your finds… & If you want, enter a date, maybe you can keep a diary or make notes of your day out in the field, it has plenty of room for that as well, it is as simple as that…


But knowledge is the key factor to any success & should you wish to bolster that knowledge, then this book encompasses everything within its pages to expand, create, & utilise a comprehensive database, which is simple to create, maintain & add to, allowing in the months & years to come, a reflective history at your fingertips…

Apart from the Artefact Journal, the other part of this book is a Field Diary, although its given name is a field diary, it is a pretender to the name, as it stays at home and does not sit neatly in your pocket or field bag…The field diary itself follows on from an illustrates past, field diaries are an important workbook in their own right, scientists & natural historians alike leave their field diaries to museums for further study by the next generation of students…
just like people all field diaries are unique, & as such the challenge here is to do anything you believe will bring your book alive, don’t be afraid to scribble notes down, do a small painting, coloured drawing, line drawing the list is endless, like any diary it is a personal account of the events that happened on that particular day, who you were with, saw, spoke to & literarily anything that you think should be written down, you will find that some days you write hardly anything down, whilst other days you will run out of paper, this is a workbook, so don’t be afraid to use the margins, and every available space, it is your own personal book so make it your own way…

Before we go too much further, I want to touch on an integral part of this book, when you record anything you have found, you will need something to write the reference number down on, with coins and artefacts these are readily available, from either a well-known auction site or specialist dealers, all I will say here is watch out, some purpose-made tags are very good value, but be aware of the postage, it can & very often does exceed the cost of the item you are buying, you can make your own, but for the cost go and buy some already made…

Please be kind to your artefacts, and make sure your coin tickets and artefact tags are acid-free, F.S.C. & come in various sizes, don’t forget your ticket should stay with the identified item for the duration of its life, why ? coin tickets from the 1700 & 1800 hundreds are as collectable as the coins, but the most important thing here is it gives both coins and artefacts providence…

There are so many people selling these coin tickets, but i used to use Pre-Decimal, before they stopped selling them, with one of the best to buy from now is on Facebook, called Hammered Corner run by Mundy Coins…


The Artefact Journal & Field Diary


Let’s start at the beginning of the book, we all know it has a green cover, so let’s turn over the front cover page, and you will see on the inside cover is your personal entry, along with the volume number, & the previous volume number, (-this is relevant if you are using more than one book, or this is the next volume-) a place to enter the date this book started & below that when the book was completed, with a place to jot down your local F.L.O.’s name below the completion date but as the F.L.O. change regularly you might want to either write it in pencil or leave enough room to insert another name besides the outgoing F.L.O. whilst the P.A.S. telephone number is situated underneath, followed your organisation name and insurance number, then there is a short welcome note from us at the bottom of the page…

I have to say here, with no apology, that, we chose a glossy page for the front cover, not for vanity or any other reasons, but it will allow for a gentle clean with a moist cloth to wipe it down once in a blue moon, the downside to this, is that the writing needs to be done with a Bic, or another cheapish pen, the better quality pens don’t take so well…


Contact Page…

On the opposite page is a handy contact page, with the relevant entries for you to fill out, where the name, address, phone, & various entries are situated, there is enough space for any social media notes to be included, this page is handy for landowners, farmers, dig organisers etc… leaving out any guesswork that you might have abbreviated on your phone…


Artefact Page

Turning the contact page over we come to the first entry of dig pages of the Artefact Journal & Field Diary

Artefact Journal…

When you open your book to the first dig page, the Artefact section is situated on the left, & is the first part of this two-page entry section;
Recording your finds could not be simpler, you might not want to archive your finds, but only to write down the artefacts you have found on any given day, whilst others might want to archive and catalogue their finds, this is where people can utilize this simple three-part system, allowing you to record your finds, with a trackable sequence for the day, date, & if parts of the diary are filled in, the location, times, which detector etc… it is all at your fingertips. To make an entry you simply write down your finds, you don’t need to go into reams of data, you might simply want to put in a livery button, or button with a line, blank coin, silver hammered etc-etc… identification comes later, but not here… try to write everything you find down, I don’t mean a blow-by-blow account, of the number of cans you find, enter them here though, simply as numerous cans, gun caps, lead, silver foil coke etc… it is surprising how varied year on year, the finds are, sometimes the field in question is non-productive whilst other years there is an abundance of finds, good or bad…
In the artefact section there is ample room if you want to write down the G.P.S. ref…, the six or eight-figure OS Reference, or even the “what3word” ref… the reason we have not dedicated this section into the book, most detectorists rarely use this method, so we removed this section to allow for a larger Artefact entry…


Storage of your Finds…

Reference Letter & Number Sequence…

The first thing you will notice is that there is a minimal amount of numbers, and the full array of the alphabet, in lower case, this is two-fold, you don’t have to switch between capital letters and lower case letters, but the most important piece here is the alphabet remains as only one letter right up to twenty-six, if we used numbers we would be into double figures, and that takes up space on the coin or artefact tickets, with the last four remaining artefact entries being numerical…

So when you come to this, it is the most important part of keeping a record and will need entering correctly, because this is your route back from the storage area to the correct Artefact Journal & Field Diary, as long as the coin tickets or tags stay with the Artefact, then everything is traceable back to its origin…
This reference sequence has been done in an order that’s been proven to work, as you are led straight back to the required book, where you can turn to the appropriate dig page, and find the given artefact number on that page if you have written the field number in, then this eliminates any of the guesswork, of which field it was found in…
The first part of any of the references is the number of the book, you must enter the book number, for illustration purposes, this is book two, so the numerical 2. gets entered…
At the bottom of the artefact page & the diary page, there is a dig number, not a page number, this dig number is written on both artefact and diary pages, & is an important part of your record, the example shown here shows it is dig number three, so the numerical 3. gets entered after the book number… (2.3.)
This is followed by the artefact number after you enter an artefact into this section, you simply write in descending order the letter or number which the artefact was written up beside, in this case, it was the second line down, so the artefact was given the number b. (- 2.3.b. -) that is it, you now have a reference number, which will stay with that artefact, creating a traceable link back to your book…

if you cannot remember what was found first, second or last, I don’t think it matters in plough soil or pasture, but for something special, you will remember where the artefact came up from, so that won’t be an issue…

Even if you get into double figures, the letters & numbers don’t get overly long, & are easily manageable on the tickets…

And with every new dig, the letters & numbers start again, so they always stay relatively short…


C.T.C.

This section below is only important if you want to file, store, collect or display your finds, otherwise, you just need the reference sequence on your tag, this CTC sequence of figures is as important as the Ref Number if you store your items, as this is the route to the storage area from the dig page
CTC… the second most important reference to enter correctly is this second of the three-part system, & itself is another three-part section, but these three parts stay together, and each of these needs a number, letter, symbol, or a combination of all three, but keep the combination small, it is prudent to use a pencil, rather than a pen until you are a hundred per cent certain where the artefact is going to stay…

The first C stands for Cabinet;

it could be a coin cabinet, artefact cabinet or something else you keep your collection in, even plastic boxes come under this heading, along with window sills, tabletops, mantle pieces ETC…

The – T – stands for Tray…

This is where the artefact or coin is kept in, if there is no tray, but “let’s say” a shelf then I suggest numbering that shelf…

The last – C

This last – C – stands for “cell” a little pocket in the tray for the coin or artefact to rest in… if it is loose & on display in a cabinet, for example then you may want to omit any data, or simple, put a letter to identify the piece, which can be written on the ticket, if there are shelves to your display cabinet then just put the shelf number down, remember how important this is, as a reminder when reading from the Artefact Journal & Field Diary, this is how you find where the coin or artefact has been stored…

Shown below is an example of a livery button that was found, it has gone into – Cabinet 4. – Tray 1. – Cell. &

Artefact Journal

Artefact
C.T.C. Ref. No. Artefact C.T.C. Ref. No.
Blank disc coin —— ——-
Livery Button 4.1.& 2.3.2.R
Love token silver I.8.@ 2.3.3.R
Buckle Frame 3.1.$ 2.3.4.R


Field Numbers…

For this final part of the reference, it can be a number or a letter, or a combination of both letter and number, use these field numbers or letters on single fields or if you tend to wander over two or three fields sometimes, then this helps to keep track of what came up & from where…
This field number is totally unnecessary to include on the coin/artefact ticket, & is totally irrelevant to track-ing an item back to the book, as when you track an item back to the book, the last part of the reference I.E., the field number will be already written down in the book, it only needs to be written in the book because the book contains all the relevant field information, & will hold the answer to which field it was found in… you don’t need to have an estate map to number fields, an ordnance survey map of 1.25 will be sufficient, as you will know where you are allowed to detect, & this way once wrote on the map it is an excellent reminder of the numbers you have given to the fields…


Please note each number is separated by a dash or a dot, 2.3.b.


Date…

Putting the date on the end of the ref number is totally unnecessary, it is already written on the page, it just crams everything in, & also restricts the amount of space on your ticket, which then becomes disjointed, instead of when you come to write your coin or artefact ticket with the ref. I suggest you put the date across the bottom or to the side of the ticket, and in different coloured ink, with the reference above the date & the C.T.C. above that, but leave enough space above that for your ID Book ref…
On the reverse of the coin ticket, the best order from the bottom to the top is the Date, Ref. C.T.C & ID Book ref; number…
By getting into the habit of writing your coin/artefact tickets in sequential order everything becomes easy to read, and not disjointed…


Field Diary… Opposite the artefact page is your field diary, in this section of the book we have strayed away from the traditional field diary & made it more relevant to Metal Detecting, yet allowing enough space to put your own unique touch to the book, on this page we have tried to cover everything that is relevant to metal detecting today, but with a fast-evolving market it is sometimes difficult to keep up, & areas of the book that is relevant to some detectorists, will not be to others, but there is enough space to write notes or to keep a proper diary related to your day out in the field…
Shown here is the top part of the page for the field diary, with a lot being self-explanatory which I will skip over…


The camera / video ref-no;

The camera / video ref-no; is a useful tool, as it links the book to when the days recording or photos was upload-ed, you can upload the files to a particular date, then change the file name for the pictures or video within your computer’s library, to include the Artefact Journal Volume Number – Dig Page & Farm Name, or a relevant name… by entering this particular short Reference Number into the book, it allows you to enter that ref. no. into the computers search engine, at any time in the future where it should take you straight to that particular file, saving the day & date for the future, a farm name or relevant name is to act a reminder when scanning through the photos, and you have the Artefact Journal & Field Diary’s ref number to go back and see what was happening on that day…


Previous AJFD Book Number; for illustration purposes, the field we are talking about here is field R, and you detected on last year, & entered it into your first Artefact Journal & Field Diary, as dig no. 89…
As an example; you have been out detecting on the exact same field again this year…
When you get to this section, find the last time you entered the details, you then take the book number, then the dig number, and for clarification the field number… you enter this sequence into the section marked Previ-ous AJFD 1-89-R
By using this section, it does not matter how many times you have detected on any particular field, because by recording the last time you detected this field, you start to create a paper trail backwards, which will over time give you one more piece of the jigsaw, creating an ever-expanding picture, at what the field has given up previously…
when you get to your second volume of the Artefact Journal & Field Diary, & it is your first time back on this field with this new book, simply enter the old book number, in this case, book number one, and dig number of the last visit, which was dig eighty-nine, 1-89-R, which translate into book 1 & can be found on dig page 89 (R) that’s the only time the ref to the first book needs to be mentioned in book two, as you move for-ward, again field numbers are best to be put down, as a cross ref to an area…
Day & Date 23.9.21 Thursday Time Out… 7.45 Time on Site… 8.20
Camera / Video Ref-No
Hayeswood 1-175-230921 Previous AJFD Book-No
1 – 89 – R
Location… Hayeswood Farm… Weather… cool, cloudy, threatened to rain all day but stayed away


At the bottom of the Field Diary page, you will find more self-explanatory sections, how many you use is your choice, if your detector relies on being plugged in tick the box, and count the battery hours, field note can for example be used for a programmes name, instead of the settings, if you changed settings halfway through or it is handy for anything that can be written in brief…

Time off Site 4.40 Time Home 5.45 Detector Used… T2
Metal Detector Battery Hours

  • 12

  • = 20½
  • Pin Pointer Bat-tery Hours
  • 7

  • = 15½ Coil Used… Standard
    Continued from Page Number Detector Settings
    88 22 2+
    93 9 2+

New Battery
New Battery
Field Numbers
R

Detector / Coil Charged Headphones Charged
Dig Field Note
Strange that this large field will have three crops on this year, side by side
Ground Condition. Bit fluffy, good to detect on, ploughed, & rolled flat yesterday, done the top end also, but still scrubby oats due to the weather, soft ground but hard digging after eight inches or so


Now if like me, and hundreds of others, you pop out for a quick hunt of an hour or so, you will not want to use up a page for that hunt, but it should be recorded, so, I believe this is the best method to avoid having to waste pages on a short and often non-productive hunt, shown here is a method to record short hunts, you will see that I have entered five quite short hunts during that particular week, with a five-hour hunt entered on Saturday, on three of those hunts all that turned up were buttons, and scrap, and this is how I entered them in the journal section, broken buttons, can, foil & other scrap…

But whether this was a non-productive search or not, to conform with the numbers remaining equal, you have to give every hunt a ref, so in book number two, this was dig number 43 with the first hunt ref of 2.43.1, but with nothing to show the CTC remains without being entered…
For the second hunt, on the same page, it then follows on with the book number two (-2-) but with an added missive to distingué be-tween each dig, use the alphabet for this as the letters get into the greater numbers be-fore reaching double figures, so dig two on the same page reads (-2A-) …
dig number is forty-three (-2A.43-)
and even though it was only scrap that was found the artefact number should be recorded as 2 (-2A.43.2-)
with the subsequent digs being given an ascending order of the alphabet and artefact numbers…
does it matter that it is dig forty-three when it should read dig forty-four or higher, I don’t think so, plus how would this fit onto the ref, (2.43-44.2. maybe, I think this would be slightly more long-winded, but it is a choice, with the next full hunt numbered higher than the previous hunt) if you find an item during a short hunt, that is what matters, it can be traced back, by any artefact or dig back to its origins, by inserting a letter, it instantly shows it was a search amongst a serious of short or non-productive hunts, sometimes you might want to include two full digs per page, then that’s another viable option, as for the battery usage, location, machine etc… use the diary as to record hours, and other data, with the last hunt use the end figure to be entered into allocated spots… most options are available simply by using the diary page, as an extension…